Agnese Coco

Agnese Coco

Agnese Coco

ARPA

She became an apprentice when young at a music studio, taking a harp diploma summa cum laude at Venice’s Conservatorio Benedetto Marcello. She took her skills further with Cristina Bianchi (tenured professor at Munich Music University), attended the masterclass under Fabrice Pierre at Fondazione Santa Cecilia di Portogruaro (Venice) and Susanna Mildonian at Venice. In 2002 she was chosen to play solo flute with Teatro La Fenice in Venice. She later joined the Italian Youth Orchestra, playing with them at important institutions as Y. Aronovich and G. Noseda conducted. Passing various auditions, she then started to collaborate with Italy’s most important orchestras, including: Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, Carlo Felice di Genova, San Carlo di Napoli, Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Teatro Verdi di Salerno, Orchestra Teatro Lirico di Spoleto etc. abroad and Maribor Opera House in Slovenia. Winner of the international competition, she has been First Harpist a Rome’s Teatro dell’Opera since 2003. Her orchestral activity, which she has enjoyed for years under the guidance of Maestros such as Riccardo Muti, Daniele Gatti, Zubin Metha, Y. Temirkanov, C. Dutoit, J. Conlon, A. Pappano, D. Renzetti, D. Rustioni and D. Oren, is accompanied by concerto work: as a solo, she has played with: I Solisti Veneti, conducted by Claudio Scimone, the Teatro dell’Opera orchestra for the chamber season, and Coro delle Voci Bianche at Rome’s Opera di Roma; she has also performed in chamber ensembles, at famed Italian centres such as: the Italian Republic Senate (2015 Christmas Concert, broadcast worldwide), Gonfalone at Rome, Teatro la Fenice at Venice, and in important international events (Portogruaro International Music Festival, Festival di Orvieto, Roma Europa Festival, Tuscania Sun Festival). She is also a committed teacher, holding masterclasses at the Conservatories of Santa Cecilia at Rome and E.F. Dall’Abaco at Verona. On the occasion of the Boheme at Roma “Seen and Heard International” she wrote: “Puccini uses the harp almost as a continuo is used in Baroque opera: a few well-placed chords which frequently and unobtrusively waft the music in the right direction when struck with the right touch, or just occasionally, like a well-disciplined, friendly traffic policeman, bring the show to a temporary pause. Conlon drew all this perfectly from the orchestra’s fine harpist, Agnese Coco, whom he had the good sense to bring to the centre of the orchestra and raise on a podium. She was admirable: a soloist who must be clear but so unobtrusive as to never sound like a soloist.”